Posted by & filed under eCommerce Websites, Executionists, Web Development, Website Cost, Website Design.



website costs 2015

Our series of “website cost” articles are the most popular on our blog, garnering about 20,000 views per month. Business owners are obviously confused by the wide difference in cost estimates provided by web development agencies, ranging widely from as little as $4,000 to over $100,000. For 2015, we are going to take a more interactive approach to help answer the website cost riddle.

EDITORS NOTE: We have released our How Much Does a Website Cost in 2016 article with new information and things to look for when planing your website in the new year.

In ALL our estimates below we assume the following:

  • Estimates are based on our hourly rate.
  • Estimates include marketing strategy, design, programming, testing and launch.
  • All new websites will be mobile/tablet-responsive.
  • All our websites are built in a CMS framework to empower non-technical staff to edit most content themselves.
  • Clients will provide all text content (body copy, product/ team images).

In order to better help you figure out your options and potential costs, we need to identify who you are and what you need. Please click on the description below that best describes your situation and we’ll jump you down the page for more personalized advice.

  1. I need a new small business website to sell a few products or to promote my services. This is my first real website.
  2. I need to improve my existing small business website to be more effective.
  3. I work for a medium-sized business in marketing or online management and we are seeking a web agency to help enhance our existing website.
  4. I am the online manager of a large business and our internal team needs help improving our website and enhancing our brand.
  5. I want to know, what are some of the other associated costs for websites?

Before we move on we want to throw a few more definitions at you: custom databases, and 3rd-party integration

Custom Database: All the websites we create use a database to hold your content so it can be displayed on your website pages. For these estimates we are assuming you need a standard, out-of-the-box database and don’t require any special customizations.

3rd-party Integrations: A “3rd-party” is any outside application or service you need to include within your website. We do include Google Analytics and some standard plug-ins in our estimates but we usually do not include integrating outside applications such as ERP systems and other complex outside services.


 

small informational website costs

Costs for first-time websites:

Our definition of “small business, first-time website” is a website consisting of up to five main sections with the total pages not to exceed 10. There is no need for custom plug-ins or databases. For e-commerce websites, we would use PayPal or a hosted cart solution like Shopify, there are no 3rd-party integrations. If you need any of this explained, please contact us.

If this is your first website you have the greatest potential to fail  – but don’t panic yet. Typically, a website budget is determined by the estimated number of hours required to design and build it. Website developers have different rates depending on their overhead. An offshore web company  may charge anywhere from $20 – $40/hr while an established US web agency may charge between $100 – $200/hr or more. You may find a solo web developer in the US charging between $25 – $100/hr.

However, we do not recommend that any serious business use a one-person shop or an offshore team. Successful website design leverages several distinct disciplines (marketing, user experience design, visual design, programming, and project management) and these are extremely hard to find in one person. With offshore agencies, communication can be a real challenge:  Do they understand your business goals? Do their design sensibilities match your market? Do they understand your instructions? The time difference can prove a difficulty as well.

When hiring a professional agency, you should write up a requirements document for all the candidate agencies to reference in their proposals, so you are comparing apples to apples. This document doesn’t have to be too complex (a page or so in length will do), but it should describe what kind of website you want, what types of pages you want (News, Contact, Services, etc.), desired functionality, and  your business goals for the website. It’s also helpful to provide examples of websites you like. Download our Client Questionnaire to begin formulating your Requirements document.

If you have a “startup” business and your business concept combines features from popular sites like Google, eBay, Facebook, YouTube, Kayak, Uber, Match, etc., then you must carefully define your website. The popular sites listed above spent millions of dollars perfecting and maintaining their core applications. Sure, there are pre-built, open-source “clones” of popular websites that can be purchased and modified but be forewarned – these are mere shadows of the originals. This underscores the importance of a website Requirements document based on a solid business plan.

If your startup business only requires an informational website or is selling a few simple products, we can work with you to make sure the website you envision will accomplish your business goals and create a strong brand.

So how much will my website cost?  Here’s our breakdown for the website described above:

Website Breakdown:

Planning – $0 – $600
UX (sitemap, wireframes) – $0 – $1200
Visual Design – $1,200 – $2,400
Programming – $3,000 – $4,800
Content Support – $240 – $600
Client Training / Documentation – $240 – $600
Testing and Launch – $960 – $1200

Total Cost: $5,640 – $11,400  *and up, depending on Requirements

This also assumes a short, streamlined approval process without too many revisions or additional requests thrown in there. Programming for e-commerce or complex websites will be more time intensive and could increase costs substantially. Post-launch we definitely recommend a minimum of $500 per month for ongoing, proactive marketing efforts and SEO.

If you have further questions please contact us for a free, detailed consultation. Call 310-754-3807 or contact us via our Inquiry Form. We also have many more articles in our blog that will help you become more successful online.


costs-2015-small-redesigns

Small business website redesigns

If you have an existing website, you are in a good position to improve your online presence with a redesign and the addition of functionality to keep you competitive. Since you already have a website and some knowledge of its effectiveness, we can leverage that experience and your new website will be much more effective at meeting your business goals.

Our definition of “small business website” is a website consisting of up to seven main sections with the total pages not to exceed 20. There is no need for custom plug-ins or databases. For e-commerce websites, we would use PayPal or a hosted cart solution like Shopify, there are no 3rd-party integrations. If you need any of this explained, please contact us.

90% of our redesign projects require a complete new programming effort. Web standards change frequently and websites that are over two years old will likely need a newer framework that supports newer functionality and design specs, such as wider pages, mobile-responsive design (tablet & phone) and the latest plug-ins. If we don’t need to rebuild your website then you can deduct about 50% from the estimates below. In order to get relevant estimates, you should prepare a Requirements document so that everyone is bidding on the same requirements. This document doesn’t have to be too complex but it should describe what enhancements you want and any new website content or business goals. Based on this document and your existing website, a web agency should be able to generate a reasonable estimate.

So how much will my website cost?  Here’s our breakdown for a simple website redesign with no custom database or 3rd-party integrations:

Website Breakdown:

Planning – $600 – $1200
UX (sitemap, wireframes) – $0 – $600
Visual Design – $960 – $2400
Programming – $3000- $7200
Content Support – $240 – $600
Client Training / Documentation – $0 – $600
Testing and Launch – $960 – $1200

Total Cost: $5,760 – $13,800  *and up, depending on Requirements

Post-launch we definitely recommend a minimum of $500 per month for ongoing, proactive marketing efforts.

If you have further questions please contact us for a free, detailed consultation. Call 310-754-3807 or contact us via our Inquiry Form. We also have many more articles in our blog that will help you become more successful online.


 

medium-website cost

Mid-size business website enhancements

For this article our definition of “mid-size business website” is a website consisting of up to seven main sections with the total pages not to exceed 30 (except in the case of e-commerce). There is no need for custom plug-ins or databases. 3rd-party integration is minimal. For e-commerce websites, we would use a hosted cart solution like Shopify or an e-commerce extension like WooCommerce. If you need any of this explained, please contact us.

If you are the marketing or website manager in your company and you have been tasked with upgrading your website then you know how important it is to have an online partner you can work with to achieve your business goals. We talk with many companies who lost their website support person and are searching for a reliable agency to enhance and maintain their online presence.   If you need enhancements to your current website we first have to see if your existing website framework can be modified to achieve your goals. These days, most business owners want their website to be mobile-responsive (tablet/phone) and unfortunately this can only be accomplished by rebuilding the whole website. In a perfect world, we can migrate the current database into a newer, responsive framework this will reduce the costs, especially if the website structure is relatively unchanged.

If the website is already mobile responsive or the current desktop version will suffice, then businesses are usually looking for ways to enhance their websites with a design/brand refresh, add new content and/or improve conversions. These efforts can often be successful if there is proper planning. If we don’t need to rebuild your website then you can deduct about 50% from the estimates below. Our process is very flexible and we are happy to work with our client’s preferred designer or marketing agency if desired. We also have monthly retainers that provide a discounted cost for a minimum number of hours each month.

Website Breakdown:

Conversion of a mid-size website to out-of-the-box, mobile-responsive website with no major additional enhancements:

Planning / UX (sitemap, wireframes) – $600 – $ 2400
Visual Design – $1200 – $2400 (some visual design elements will need to be modified due to mobile responsive specifications)
Programming – $3800 – $4800 (for smaller websites)
Programming – $4800 – $9600 (for larger websites)
Content Support/ Migration – $600 – $1200
Client Training / Documentation – $0 – $600
Testing and Launch – $960 – $2,400

Total Cost: $7,160 – $13,800 for smaller websites  *and up, depending on Requirements
Total Cost: $8,160 – $18,600 for larger websites  *and up, depending on Requirements

If you have further questions please contact us for a free, detailed consultation. Call 310-754-3807 or contact us via our Inquiry Form.


large website costs

Large-size business website enhancements

For this article our definition of “large-size business website” is a website consisting of up to eight main sections with the total pages not to exceed 40 (except in the case of e-commerce). There is no need for custom plug-ins or databases. 3rd-party integrations are minimal. For e-commerce websites, we could use an e-commerce solution like Magento CE or WooCommerce, no ERP integrations. If you need any of this explained, please contact us.

If you are the marketing or website manager in a larger business and you have been tasked with upgrading or enhancing your website then you know how important it is to have a reliable, full-service, online partner. We talk with many companies who want to outsource their website design and maintenance tasks because their internal team is too busy or not up-to-date with contemporary web trends and standards.

Larger companies with multiple branches or divisions typically have more complex websites with multiple sections and sub-sections of content. This means that the database and page templates can require more effort to build. If you need website enhancements, we need to determine if your existing website framework can be modified to achieve your goals. These days, most business owners want their website to be mobile-responsive. In most cases, we can only implement this functionality by rebuilding the website using newer framework. In a perfect scenario, we would be able to migrate the current database into a newer, responsive framework. If that’s possible, it will help to reduce the costs, especially if we’re not radically modifying website structure in the new version.

If the website is already mobile responsive or the current desktop version will suffice, then businesses are usually looking for ways to enhance their websites with a design refresh, add new content and/or improve conversions. These efforts can be successful if there is proper planning and adherence to the company style guide and coding best-practices. If we don’t need to rebuild your website then you can deduct about 50% from the estimates below. Our process is also very flexible and we are happy to work with our client’s preferred designer, marketing agency and internal tech team, if desired.

Website Breakdown:

Large website conversions to an out-of-the-box, mobile-responsive website with no additional enhancements:

Planning / UX – $1,200 – $2,400 *and up
Visual Design – $2,400 – $3,600 (some visual design elements will need to be modified due to mobile responsive specifications)
Content Support/ Migration – $600 – $1800
Programming – $7,500 – $15,500
Client Training / Documentation – $600 – $1800
Testing and Launch – $2,400 – $4,800

Total Cost: $14,700 – $29,900  *and up, depending on Requirements

If you have further questions please contact us for a free, detailed consultation. Call 310-754-3807 or contact us via our Inquiry Form.


 

Other Website Components and Costs

 

besides the main cost of designing and building a website, there are other costs that can impact your budget during development and on an ongoing maintenance basis. Following is a list of those associated costs.

Domain name – $10/year (or less)

Hosting – $50 to $100+ a year depending on traffic and hosting services. For example you may want to pay extra for regular website backups and extra security features.

License or cost of plugins: There are thousands of extensions, plugins, widgets, modules and applications that can add great features to your website at a low cost. In the old days we had to build these from scratch. Now it’s a matter of paying a small fee $0 – $300 or annual license $20 – $1,000+ and adding the feature to your website. Keep in mind that these plugins are mini-applications that have versions so at some point the version will “expire” and need to be updated. Updating an expired plugin can be simple as one-click or complex taking many hours of effort. Usually a professional developer will have to upgrade or update your expired plugin.

Continued website maintenance and upgrades: $1,000+ per year, depending on level of support and updates required.

Stock art: Royalty-free stock art photos and graphics can range from $15 – $100+ each depending on license fees and usage.

Marketing Your Website Online / SEO – $750 a month and up to proactively market your website.

If you’ve read this far, you must be serious about your web business. Take the next step by clicking the button below to fill out our short inquiry form. We will get back to you ASAP with a recommendation. No obligation – you can also call us at 310-754-3807 because we love to chat.

 

Free Consultation

If you’re a busy executive and want to zoom into your marketing analytics – check out our custom marketing reports using Google Data Studio.

  • Web Guru

    Why oh why did I want to start my reply with “Winning”? Oh.. nevermind the cheap laugh. I couldn’t agree with you more. Designers are so different than developers, and “developers” are rarely needed for first time website owners. I have dealt with 3 first time website clients over the last few weeks and each needed a 5-6 page site with a landing page, and even that landing page with an unbounced contact page (name/email/etc) didn’t have much coding other than a simple javascript url for where the information went. Sure, in the future, more time, effort, and money will be needed for bigger projects. But I could never ask a first time website owner who has hopes of succeeding but in reality has never sold a unit or a customer lined up, who works out of their garage to shell out $11,000+. I don’t think any of the three clients had a budget over $5k and even that was pushing it with a maintenance contract. I want the big pay day, sure, who wouldn’t, but I also want their business and $11k on a first time site won’t get me business.

    • Damian Baksh

      The two of you need to step out of your small minded kijiji special mentality.

      Executionists clearly explained it was at THEIR hourly rate. If you have the knowledge, experience and possible accreditation’s then you can charge however you want. The quality will show in your work from proposal to post maintenance. You two clearly devalue the mixture of design, strategy, and development to realize that this is an average price for a website. Anything less (drag and drop builders, squarespace, etc) will show in the quality. A we design project timeline I created takes about 150 hrs (from intro to quality assurance). Depending on the other services (print mainly), discounts and hourly rate will determine that value.

      “charliesheenhardcore” and “web guru” are just your average-reposting-craiglist “web designers”.The design field is full of people devaluing services. Getting someone who can do it for “cheaper” is not the way to go. I price my work based on QUALITY and not what people assume how prices would be.

      To all the other viewers….these types of articles get 30000 views per month because both client and agency/freelancer uses it as a reference. It is more than accurate, and I bet many businesses have been successful from it. I DEFINITELY have.
      #knowyourclient
      #winning

      • Thank you! Those comments were ridiculous. lol. These costs are perfectly reasonable for people who actually want a decent looking site. The time, education and experience it takes to create something that does what it’s intended to do for both the organization and the user is actually pretty extensive. That includes copywriting, neuroscience in regards to sales/loyalty, internal linking and silo-structuring for SEO… I can see how people who just throw something up without regard to the actual success of the brand/nonprofit wouldn’t feel justified charging higher prices,

        • You are right Melissa, I have been a developer for almost 20 years now and have in time gained extensive knowledge of development and design. The amount of hours along with the experiential requirements to not only make a website look appealing but serve the purpose intended is a laborious set of chores for even a skilled developer. Social media alone and the endless battle in defeating the latest algorithm is draining alone. Now don’t get me wrong, I am very flexible in my prices when it comes to someone just starting out in business that needs some initial help. These are usually the folks that can be barely pay and are not overly concerned with advanced functionality. In my experience, the other side of the coin is an established business of success who won’t blink an eye at a $2000 After Effects presentation. The big guys of course are not only willing to pay and do, but get charged accordingly. That said, the little guy gets a chance to get started and ends up happy while the big guy gets bigger and his company website and its’ presentation represent just that. For myself, it’s about being not only a good businessman but a decent, compassionate human being.

        • Julia White

          Absolutely right. Anyone who says that these prices are wrong, probably hasn’t worked with clients long enough to know you can establish long lasting relationships even after the website is done. The end product is what matters. You get what you pay for.

    • Alicia St Rose

      You are aware that if your clients wish to move on from Wix in the future, they cannot export their content? It stays with Wix. This is not a good idea for a business practice at all. And if Wix decides to close up shop, you’re screwed just like all of those iWeb folks a few years back.

    • SunShine

      Wix? Oh c’mon. You should simply point the client at Wix and have them only pay you for the consult. And web guru? Oh dear. Oh dear.

      • Master designers use the platform because they don’t know coding. To lazy to learn the real thing. 🙂 no offence.

    • Wix required the brain of developers, without developers Wix is nothing. No serious customer will go for Wix, Wix is for new inexperienced first timers. And a yes, It’s no more useful than a bad jpg

  • It depends who the clients are and what the value is. I’m sure you know more than most that a website is like a car. Yes you can get any car for $2000 and it will get the job done, but it probably won’t be that pretty, won’t impress that many people (leads) and won’t help you pick up girls with no additional work (conversions). Why do real estate agents by and large have nice and clean expensive cars? Because communicates a level of professionalism and sophistication.

    If the customer is a local business where bookings and sales can’t be justified by a high website cost, then yes the prices are steep for a small business. If you’re a local Italian restaurant, the online booking and other amenities probably aren’t going to be game changers. Most likely you’ll need a menu (not a PDF), an address and map, a story about why your restaurant is unique, and a few others. If you’re a local cupcake shop, unless you’re selling online, spending $10k+ on a website will probably take a while to see increased ROI. If anyone has awesome examples at this level that contradicts/supports would love to hear!

    For designers/developers – I highly recommend Brennan Dunn’s or Ugurus’ websites for understanding value provided and how to communicate and plan that.

    For business owners that are confused, I would highly recommend you see your website as an asset, not as a cost. Do you do phone book ads, radio ads, mailers, all that still? What’s the yearly cost? Consider spending at least that much on a site. Think about what your true goals for the site are. If you look at it as “I just need a website” – well, why? Most of the time it’s because you want to make more money. You get more money by more customers converting. Think about the value that each additional customer brings. If each customer is worth $500 in lifetime value (either all at once or in repeat purchases), then would you pay $10,000 instead of $5,000 if it doubles your online customers over the next year?

  • Josh Petersen

    I have to laugh at the comments saying their estimates are too expensive. Take a step back and see where this page lands on Google search for the search terms that got you here. What’s that worth to a new business owner. If a business owner accepts a Wix level design then they should expect a Wix level response.

  • I’m not interested in fighting over this but I have to agree that some of these estimates are way off-base. I do web design myself and I’ve been on the hiring side as well.

    I will agree that finding a decent, one-person operation is extremely difficult, but outright “not recommending” is insulting. There are plenty of so called “agencies” that charge grossly inflated prices and deliver sub-par work. For small business owners, it’s about finding the right fit, within their budget–not a matter of single person vs. design company.

    • geordiechris

      Often an agency thinks they can charge whatever, not only as they have more overheads but as I believe there’s something in the concept of ‘reassuringly expensive’ with some clients. The ‘you get what you pay for’ cliche does at times do a disservice to the good lone webby. That’s perhaps why many one-man band webbies refer to themselves as ‘we’ or ‘us’ (a dangerous game to play in my book). But yeah, like you say, there’s plenty of god-awful agency work out there. And yep, it’s all about the target market, budget and fit (perhaps I should have saved some virtual ink and just written ‘ditto’!)

      • I’m with you on the “we/us” references. Solos are ‘solo’ and it’s never a good idea to use deception to attract new business-as seemingly innocent as referring to yourself in the plural sense.

  • SunShine

    Reading these comments made me antsy….

    Folks, the size of the client business does not determine the price of the service. The service that is delivered determines the price. And price is first set by running your numbers. Take the wage you should be getting in the marketplace. Then divide by 60% of total billable hours in a year, which is 2080. If you’re working full-time and moving, you should be billing out 60 percent of your time. Lower and the price has to go up. For 60K gross wage, that means about $48/hr. To that 48, you need to add overhead plus profit. We use a factor of 3.1 which pencils out right, when dividing the gross simply by 2080. That results in a $68/hour fee. If you can produce a website in 15 hours, be booked at 60%, and charge at that rate, then you generate the 60K. If you want lower wages, recalculate. But, folks, it starts with numbers. Then look at what the market is charging and adjust but don’t go below.

    You may find you simply cannot serve a certain segment of the marketplace because they simply cannot afford you. For years, I ran a firm that never worked local. The reason was the local small business could simply not afford us and I had business expenses to pay. We did a charity give-away once each year for hometown.

    In this market, we have a retiree who point blank says he is not charging billable rates as he does not need the income. As a result, every mom and pop shop buys from him and has been taught that websites cost $200 for everything — from copy to photography to code. I wait for about a year and then contact them. Inevitably they have discovered what $200 did not buy them and they are ready for professional work. When that occurs, my business will finance them, with a contract. I have had paper here that we have turned around and sold if we need the cash flow from those contracts now rather than later. But we don’t change the price — only the terms.

    Don’t underestimate what you are worth, assuming you’re not selling a Wix site. lol…

    • scottrichardson

      Great reply, and well said. Learning not to underestimate your worth, or your studio’s worth is one of the most valuable lessons I have learned over the past few years.

    • Capt.Steve Thompson

      Sun-shine you touched on a number of issues. But the fundamental question —outside the ongoing services for SEO– is “what do you sell”. My wife sells Liquidated inventory as individual items on a website. The format is the same for every item, she does her own photography, and the sales/inventory/order/postage/shipping/return and financials software is integrated. The “look hasn’t and needn’t change, the interactive aspect is clicking on photos and order entry. She has over 600 items for sale Her site cost X.
      I build boats with 8 models and 30 possible configurations, and well as on site advertising, downloadable brochure, and “build your boat “features. My website cost 20X.

      My accountants and attorneys are $300K+ income guys, and their websites are WIX and iPage and cost 1/8X.
      Its all about what you sell and how.

      • admin

        Hi Capt.Steve, yes – what you sell is important, especially if you have a niche product with little competition. In this case even if your website looks out-of-date, customers will still buy. If you have a lot of competition for your service or product, you need to have a website that is competitive also. Accountants and Attorneys get the majority of their business from networking and word of mouth. The website is generally a calling card and to add credibility. In this case a WIX site could work BUT I guarantee a mid to large professional services company wouldn’t want a WIX website for a variety of reasons that I will go into in another blog post. Good luck with your custom boats site.

  • Igoogled Thatish

    I think he’s under pricing actually. But he’s close and people do pay these prices. If you are a bad designer who chases the $100-$300 website contracts; and cant do CMS, SEO server side scripting and are the kinda of designer who uses page builder or dreamweaver…. You will attract the lower end clients .. these people actually think wix sites are amazing… You are definitely in your niche market. If that’s what you consider fair payment, you will fit right in with the contest entrants working for free all day on 99designs and the Indian offshore crowd sourcing puppets, who have no problem working for less than 5 cents per hour. lol
    I think charliesheenhardcore is mostly upset because he doesn’t know how to do web development. hey Charlie sheen the early 2000’s called they want there tables back and that awful mullet …cause we are totally using divs bro and beiber hair… stay classy! my face though when I see a designer/developer still using front page….hahahha!

  • Donald

    Ok, I’m not a “professional” by any standards, so at the end of this post I have a question. There are people out there who don’t have a budget. They prefer a drag and drop website, but don’t have or don’t want to take the time to do it themselves. I have done this once for a friend who helped me greatly in the past, so I didn’t charge anything. She would’ve paid somewhere in the ball park of 250-350. I disclosed “everything” on how it’s done and I tailor it to their liking. A friend of hers has seen the website I “dragged and dropped” for her and will be calling me sometime this weekend to talk about me doing the same for her. It’s the same issue…no budget, no time. By the way I also helped my friend develop a logo for her business.

    I don’t hide anything. I explain how it’s done. I don’t act like I’m doing something “great” or “complex”. I don’t pretend to be an expert in SEO or promise them a ton of traffic. I let my friend know before I started that SEO and marketing, etc. will have to be sought after, and they are ongoing costs.

    In short am I an abomination to the industry?

    • Skeptic

      I don’t think so– just a different tier of work. Some people can only afford $350 for a drag-and-drop website. That allows them to tick the basic “Yes, we have a website” box, but that’s about all it does. It won’t have the SEO to rank especially high in Google, it won’t have the psychological tricks to help the visitors emotionally connect to the business, it won’t have the professional copywriting or commerce functions to convert customers, etc. If ever the people with your drag and drop sites find themselves needing that functionality, they’ll come to us!– and if not, then we really wouldn’t have any right to be working with them in the first place. If all they need is a drag and drop site, then that’s what they should be getting (and paying for!).

      • Donald

        I appreciate you taking the time to respond. And respond honestly, thanks!

      • Disco Duck

        I don’t completely disagree that there are different levels of optimized websites from the drag and drop all the way up to the overpriced builds that the article suggests are appropriate for small businesses (which they aren’t but that topic has been beaten to death here). I do take issue with the blanket suggestion that a site wouldn’t rank especially well just because it is a simple template based site. Google ranks based in very large measure by content so it matters less now than it did in the recent past what your site platform is. There are enough tools out there to make even the simplest site optimized reasonably enough to rank well in a specialty niche. From there, it is a matter of understanding what you need to do to rank better and either hire a reasonably priced designer or figure it out for yourself.

        I just don’t like the blanket statement that the site won’t have what it takes to rank well. That is not necessarily true.

    • No Donald, you’re not an abomination. The world needs more people like You! I’m serious. Look at where we’re at right now… people cheating and lying to other people just to get some papers…

      • Donald

        Ynef, thanks, I appreciate your response.

  • popular design

    website development cost are depends on website requirement. webdesign is important and friendly then people are attract. also they easily understand your business. this is nice blog..!

    • Bhavin Mandaliya

      I have to laugh at the comments saying their estimates are too
      expensive. What’s that worth to a
      new business owner. If a business owner accepts a Wix level design then
      they should expect a Wix level response.

  • Ynef

    A small website for $5,000+… seriously? There are a bunch of very talented web designers out there who charge ten times LESS and they do their job well, out of passion and not out of hunger for money.

    In my country (Estonia) the minimum wage is 390 EUR/month or 2,32 EUR/Hour. I know, this completely sucks and a lot of us are struggling, but the point I’m trying to make is that web design skills can be learned exactly the same way no matter where you are from.

    Therefore the people who live in poor countries would be super happy to design your basic website for just $500 or even less, and it would still be more than they would earn working full time in some lousy workplace.

    • scottrichardson

      I guess it’s dependent on the geographic location and economical situation of that country. Our studio takes weeks to develop even a small business website. We spend days analysing their business, their goals, their competition, studying art styles. We then wireframe, sit with client multiple times, iterate and then finally produce visual mockups. Then we finally move on to hand-coding (on our base custom framework) their web site, then hand mobile and tablet optimising. Everything is fully custom tailored to the client’s needs. $5000 barely covers our time with several staff members tasked on the job. But we do totally understand, and appreciate that web sites CAN be designed and built for less money. But I am certain that less time is spent on them, whether they are done using a CMS (WordPress, Joomla etc), or web builder like WIX, templates etc. That’s just not our approach, nor our market. Our studio and team have a passion for detailed, carefully planned and articulated custom solutions, hand coded and hand designed to the last pixel to ensure it delivers in the best possible way.

  • Steve Mark

    Good article.thanks

  • Steve Mark

    Site look like new , attractive and responsive site

  • Jose Ruiz Jr.

    I always ask my clients how much a customer is worth to them, and what the lifetime value of their customers would be. This helps them see the bigger picture. People need to see value. Some will see the costs and not remember that there is a reason they come to us. 1.) They don’t know how to do it. 2.) They KNOW they need a website. It’s our job to help them understand WHY they need one if they don’t really know why.

  • SunShine

    Nah — only if you let it. As I said, I change the terms so that they are affordable to smaller budgets but I never change the price. Of course, one can change what is offered as features but I prefer to give small business owners what is needed to grow their businesses. When they see the revenue increase, suddenly the price for the website is no longer an issue. What is an issue for them is financing it at the onset.

    You need to learn to better respond to that question “How much does it cost”? For small business, I say “x per month for x months with x as security.” Suddenly, they’re comfortable because it fits into their monthly budget and in return you get cash flow over a longer period of time. But do secure it…that way if you need to sell the receivable as a note you are able to do so.

    • scottrichardson

      One thing to consider is that a bigger client, with a larger potential budget, means you can add in more ancillary services, such as user group testing, usability workshops, deeper research and analysis, strategy and perhaps allocate even more time to the design phase, allowing you to come up with even richer visuals, special treatments, or advanced javascript techniques etc… smaller budgets won’t allow you to include those elements.

  • jaredsbanz

    I don’t think these are outrageous at all. You get what you pay for… You could try to outsource it. That being said, you get what you pay for with design. As for the development, you’ll likely get someone who will do it super cheap and just install a bunch of unsupported plugins. Then, when they get out-dated, your website is at risk for hackers and will likely crash. When that happens, you’ll need to hire another developer to fix it… Might as well save yourself the headache an do it right the first time.

    • Susie Sanchez

      I completely disagree. Your comment assumes that there will be NO ALTERNATIVE to a site becoming outdated. So what if Wix disappears? There will be an alternative. So what if squarespace disappears? There will be an alternative.

      All websites even those precious sites created from scratch by developers will too eventually become outdated. And at that point a new alternative will have to be researched regardless of how talented the developer is or which platform was used to make the site.

      • jaredsbanz

        Susie, I apologize if I came across as saying a site won’t become out-dated. I completely agree with you that no matter what platform is chosen, it will need to be continually upgraded. To think otherwise would be foolish.

        • Susie Sanchez

          Yes. In my honest opinion it is CRUCIAL that a designer or a developer knows the latest in website design and development. What’s new and whats trending. This way, when it’s time upgrade they are ready to do business with a former client again. If a platform becomes utterly useless it is important to know other platforms to better serve your clients.

      • mrgingrich

        I’ve never seen a Wix site hit the top of Google for anything. NEVER. Because without access to the code, you can’t do sufficient SEO.

  • Susie Sanchez

    Honestly I can see both sides of the equation. I can see why a website can cost just as much as these estimates. People fail to understand that it is not just a website being built. It’s planning the entire structure, design, working on the SEO which takes time, consultation with the client, making sure all the clients needs are met.

    I have had numerous clients come back to me asking me for website changes and I could not charge them because I undervalued myself. I simply charged them a one time fee that was too small and did not include all of the work that would come AFTER the site was published.

    On the other hand…

    What’s wrong with Wix? What’s wrong with squarespace? What’s wrong with Shopify? What’s wrong with wordpress? Nothing whatsoever.

    A friend of mine runs a small business in the healthcare industry. He yields about 20 million annually in revenue. His website is terrible looking but the company is very effective in selling products and providing excellent customer service.

    Sometimes, having a pretty website doesnt mean there will be an increase in sales. As a matter of fact some oil and gas companies making millions and millions in profit have the simplest website design structure you can think of…

    You choose what works for you. If you do not have the budget nor the time to build a website then you can pay someone to do it for you at low or fair prices.

    If you do have the budget but not the time you can use a website design company which charges by the hour. In the US they are expensive but there are cheaper alternatives in the United Kingdom and Australia for example. WAY CHEAPER.

    If you have the time, simply make it yourself.

    The whole point is that there’s no need to dismiss the impact of sites like wix, squarespace, wordpress, or other website builders. Think of these as fast food restaurants. They are quick. They are efficient. They get the job done.

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  • aanchal

    Hi, can you please explain ” the client training/documentation” of the breakdown??

    • admin

      On the simple websites we build, we allocate a couple of hours to creating a website guide that has screenshots and instructions on the common content updates a client will want to make. We will also train the client for up to an hour or two on how to make website updates (most clients learn in about 15 minutes). Of course we are always available post-launch to answer quick questions.

  • Crystal Milk

    72 hours * 6 people = 350,000 annual income for 6 people, so 50k a year is probably right.

  • scottrichardson

    I was thinking about this myself. For 2016, we’re adding additional ancillary services for our clients, such as usability and UX workshops, wire framing sessions, A/B testing etc. So our costs have to go up to reflect the additional time spent and services offered. We’re also upping our agency hourly rate from $120AUD to $130AUD. We’ve moved into a bigger, nicer space, and feel that we still charge extremely competitively for 100% custom projects. There’s another studio not too far from us that charges a little more than us for WordPress websites :/

  • Mona Lisa

    I just called a company (not Executionists) and was told the minimum cost for a website is 80k. Fleecing at its finest.